Toshiba Z830–Full Satellite and Portege Model Line-Up (Official Specs and UK Prices)

Posted on 22 October 2011 By


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Following the discovery of two models of the Z830 in Europe yesterday we got a tip pointing us to the complete line-up at the Toshiba UK website. As we reported last week, the Z830 appears under both the Satellite and Portégé brands.

Lets get straight to the details.

Toshiba Satellite Z830

  • Z830-10T Core i3 2367M, 128GB SSD, 4GB RAM, Windows 7 Home Premium – £899
  • Z830-10U Core i5 2467M, 128GB SSD, 6GB RAM, Windows 7 Home Premium – £999
  • Z830-10J Core i5 2467M (1.6Ghz), 128GB SSD, 4GB RAM, Windows 7 HP – €1099 [That’s Euros. Also seen for €999 online. Information seen in German market]

Toshiba Portege Z830

  • Z830-10N Core i3 2367M, 128GB SSD, 4GB RAM, Windows 7 Home Premium – £899 (Includes Toshiba Easy Guard security features)
  • Z830-10P Core i3 2367M, 128GB SSD, 4GB RAM, Windows 7 Professional – £969 (Includes Toshiba Easy Guard security features)
  • Z830-104 Core i5 2557M (1.7Ghz), 128GB SSD, 4GB RAM, Windows 7 Professional – £1099 (Includes Toshiba Easy Guard security features)

Notes: There’s a memory slot being used for some of the memory. 2GB remains on board. Low-end versions might be upgradeable. Wifi and BT is provided by Intel modules (meaning possible but still not 100% confirmed Wi-Di support on all models) All models have the backlit keyboard. As only the Portégé models feature the Intel Anti-Theft technology, it should be noted that the Satellite versions may not be true Ultrabooks. (As all Ultrabooks must have Intel Anti-Theft.) Core i3 models do not include Turbo Boost.

It’s somewhat disappointing to see so many Core i3 models here, don’t you think?

Remember that the prices are UK prices inclusive of sales tax. (120% of net price)

Thx Explaining Computers.

More links, images, specs, information in the Toshiba Z830 information page.

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  1. #1 by Power__89 on October 23, 2011 - 01:11

    Not one i7 included? Dissapointment througout

  2. #2 by Michaelpaulpenang on October 23, 2011 - 01:51

    Why disappointed? UK buyers are pretty conscious about pricing. So, the i3 would be affordable. You see, unlike the US, where consumers fall for hype and marketing and are obssessed with speed (when computers are concerned), UK buyers are pretty content with an i3 as they feel it not only suits their needs but can do everything just as fast as an i5 and i7. ALl those figures you see on benchmarksare only figures. In reality, for 90% of people, an i3 really does not have a significant difference in your day to day experience as compared to an i5. So many of us are guilty of buying that superfast computer but only using it merely to open our web browser and surf.

    Toshiba realises that the US is not its only market and there are other significant markets as well.

    • #3 by chippy on October 23, 2011 - 02:33

      I agree that the Core i3 gives you nearly everything that a consumer would want but I’ve seen the Turbo feature give some significant advantages on web browsing and other start-stop computing scenarios.

      • #4 by Michaelpaulpenang on October 24, 2011 - 04:18

        hi chippy, you might be interested in reading this article. I guess majority of US buyers want a desktop replacement 15.6 machine. Those who want ultralights just go for tablets at 599 grams and below. The is just a small niche market demanding 13 inch ultra light notebooks

        http://blog.laptopmag.com/can-intels-ultrabooks-sway-a-large-laptop-loving-market

        • #5 by Anonymous on October 24, 2011 - 12:53

          Thanks for sharing Michael.

          I’m one of the consumers that would like to keep a 15″ screen but with ultrabook specs.

          I’ve seen, and tested, 13″ laptops but, to me, it just doesn’t feel right. I feel as if the smaller screen would be a hindrance when watching a movie/television on the laptop.

          Can anyone else relate to that?

          • #6 by Power__89 on October 24, 2011 - 13:07

            One of the key advantages of the toshiba is the vga – hdmi output, for linking to external screen. Personally, i’m planning to use the 13″ screen for travel work, and a external 21″ for home usage. Best of both worlds!

          • #7 by Michaelpaulpenang on October 24, 2011 - 13:17

            Agree with you totally Power_89. The1NamedMarc, I think the best combo would be to get a light 11.6 and just connect to a huge 23 inch monitor at home. I plan to do that. Infact, even better, get a good 2.1 or 5.1 speakers and you will have the ultimate laptop.

  3. #8 by Power__89 on October 23, 2011 - 12:38

    Typically, consumers want choices, not limitations. Altough you make a valid point, from consumers standpoint (and as well production standpoint) there is no obvious reason why toshiba withholds an i7 version, competion in highvalue ultrabook segment. At the very least it would have been profitable to offer a upgrade option, making a profit on people who are driven by the (as you call it) ‘hype’ of superfast computers. It’s personal use-efficiency is neither your or toshiba’s business.
    I, personally, think that they are missing out on the niche of consumers who are sceptic of the lowvoltage I3 and I5 against the normalvoltage i5 and who think an i7 LV would be a great compremise. I, for one, am such a consumer, who could love with LV i5, but also needs to run high maintainence statistical programs, so would prefer i7.

    It’s not about functionality, it’s about choice and customization.

    • #9 by Michaelpaulpenang on October 23, 2011 - 15:22

      I think Toshiba must have done their market research and concluded there aren’t many people needing i7. Infact, if you see all the big notebook vendors, i7 notebooks hardly move. Gone are the days where consumers got excited with a newly launched higher mgz or ghz cpu from what they currently have. I remember those days, when the Pentium II 266 came out for example, then suddenly the Pentium II 300 came out, everybody wanted to upgrade their systems and wanted the new cpu.

      It does not happen these days. Majority of consumers aren’t really bothered these days. Toshiba knows this. They know, most people are content with an i5. I think Toshiba is not alone in this. Look at the other ultrabook manufacturers, they are focussing mainly on their i5s.

      • #10 by Power__89 on October 23, 2011 - 16:17

        I guess this must be true, still a shame though…

    • #11 by rellZ on October 26, 2011 - 15:23

      exactly

      that is the point here, give the costumer the decision to get what HE wants… leavin out an i7 option or 256 SSD option is just plain dumb ..

      i cant even formulate it any different…

      and i am in the same position that i would prefer an i7 over the i5 maybe it not the biggest drama in benchmarking, but as you know, some ppl just want the ‘best’ at the time cuz they have different needs and software which take more CPU then the next one…

      so again leave this decision to the costumer..

  4. #12 by Draven on October 23, 2011 - 13:41

    There will be some i7 options in other countries right Chippy?

    • #13 by Chippy on October 23, 2011 - 15:08

      Toshiba said yes, there would be i7 versions.

  5. #14 by Sunir on October 23, 2011 - 14:58

    No 256 GB model. Expected but still disappointed. :(

    • #15 by Turk on December 27, 2011 - 10:16

      Enghlitening the world, one helpful article at a time.

    • #16 by wdhtmxyuxyp on December 29, 2011 - 10:43

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  6. #17 by Tupaq on October 24, 2011 - 14:16

    is this a joke now?

    no 256GB SSD option NO i7 option??

    even when i pay for it…

    this was my favorite book just until now …ill check into the lenovo instead even tho the toshiba was my alltime favorite and i was only waiting for costumer reviews..

    but this is some real real disappointment there……….

  7. #18 by beaforce1 on October 25, 2011 - 07:20

    Hi all,

    I am a big fan of the atom netbooks cause of the size and battery life. I really just love these as they do what I need and the battery lasts for ever.

    I have a question. What is the battery life for the various models. This is to say how long does the battery last for the LVi3 vs the non LVi5 top model. I also wonder how long he equivalent a low voltage atom battery would last for? I mean is there a huge difference or am I just imagining it.

    thanks heaps

    • #19 by Chippy on October 25, 2011 - 08:35

      In web activities there isn’t much real world difference. A netbook might average 7w drain, an Ultrabook, 9w drain but you’ll get.more.done on an Ultrabook. An Ultrabook, when pushed hard doing way more than a netbook can dream of, can go to 25w drain but a netbook tops it at about 15w.

      Its a choice between weight, battery life and the dynamic range of the system you want.

  8. #20 by Marino on October 25, 2011 - 22:52

    are the toshibas atleast coming with i7 cpu option or is this ruled out as well now?

    all i see is i5 even on their website advertisement…

    not offering a 256GB ssd disk for a business laptop is already a shame enough but what about the i7 CPU…

    i am about to try and install a 256GB SSD into this piece if there is no other way out….

  9. #21 by Alfabeta on October 26, 2011 - 01:09

    128GB SSD aren’t enough nowadays… :-(

    • #22 by Micahelpaulpenang on October 26, 2011 - 05:52

      Having a 128GB is more than enough. With the advent of cheap 2.5 external drives, who needs a big drive in your notebook? You can get an external 1TB WD so cheaply these days and store most of your data externally. Surely one does not need over 100GB data at any given time in a day. If you need more stuff, just cut and paste from your external.

      Having a smaller drive is good cause in case you lose your notebook or the SSD gets corrupted, you don’t lose all your stuff.

      • #23 by Chippy on October 26, 2011 - 09:13

        External drive doesn’t help those that are mobile in my opinion. Online storage and sdxc card slots will help though.

      • #24 by rellZ on October 26, 2011 - 15:08

        who needs a “big” 256gb ssd drive nowadays?

        i do!!

        and i dont plan or feel like carrying around 20 more devices, usb sticks and much more to fullfill my needs..

        and what has having a bigger harddrive to do with losing stuff?

        so why do ppl even build above 1.5TB HDDs… i mean look the risk of losing so much stuff what kidn of logic is this ..

        if you lose important stuff when you lose it one way or another no matter if it is 128 or 256 GB…its lost.. face it…

        and 100GB is not much, a few complicated softwares, a litle music and 2-3 movies and a few more and you already over 100GB easily … a game like COD takes 10 GB alone…

        if i wanted to carry around a USB stick ( which is then NO ssd ) or any external 2.5 hdds in a backpack, i would do it… but i dont want it..

        it is 2011 and soon 2012, so since when is 128GB enough to handle in these times… atleast give me an option so i can buy it .. i will pay for it…

        you dont have to make it a standard, but give the costumer the decision to decide what are his needs…it is just a stupid move from toshiba…

  10. #25 by Turbo123 on October 26, 2011 - 01:12

    No need for i7 really, but 256GB SSD should be in option !!!

  11. #26 by rellZ on October 26, 2011 - 15:13

    and the i5 or i7 part is maybe not such a big drama but the 128gb SSD part is a bigtime joke….

    do they expect me to open the laptop and install a 256GB myself now, i didnt plan to do all this effort…

    all i wanted is to buy the toshiba it has been my favorite model so far but im leaning to the lenovo now, they have 256GB + i7 + good battery…

    but a gloss display and less ports and i dont know if on lenovo you can disable the trackpad what you can do on he toshiba model…

    i just dont get how 2 decisions can be that stupid you expect them to be smarter than this selling a business orientated laptop with a 128GB ssd inside… like really….

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